Nashville New Homes: Why Black-Eyed Peas & Greens?

Why not prme rib?  Why not chocolate cake?  Why do the delicacies for the first day of the New Year have to be things that aren’t fit to eat, with a nasty coin dropped in them?  Where all has that coin been anyway?  I hope no one ate it last year.    

Here is the history of the New Year’s grub according to about.com: 

The practice of eating black-eyed peas for luck is generally believed to date back to the Civil War. At first planted as food for livestock, and later a food staple for slaves in the South, the fields of black-eyed peas were ignored as Sherman’s troops destroyed or stole other crops, thereby giving the humble, but nourishing, black-eyed pea an important role as a major food source for surviving Confederates.

Today, the tradition of eating black-eyed peas for the New Year has evolved into a number of variations and embellishments of the luck and prosperity theme including:

  • Served with greens (collards, mustard or turnip greens, which varies regionally), the peas represent coins and the greens represent paper money. In some areas cabbage is used in place of the greens.
  • Cornbread, often served with black-eyed peas and greens, represents gold.
  • For the best chance of luck every day in the year ahead, one must eat at least 365 black-eyed peas on New Year’s Day.
  • Black-eyed peas eaten with stewed tomatoes represent wealth and health.
  • In some areas, actual values are assigned with the black-eyed peas representing pennies or up to a dollar each and the greens representing anywhere from one to a thousand dollars.
  • Adding a shiny penny or dime to the pot just before serving is another tradition practiced by some. When served, the person whose bowl contains the penny or dime receives the best luck for the New Year, unless of course, the recipient swallows the coin, which would be a rather unlucky way to start off the year.

The catch to all of these superstitious traditions is that the black-eyed peas are the essential element and eating only the greens without the peas, for example, will not do the trick.

The practice of eating black-eyed peas for luck is generally believed to date back to the Civil War. At first planted as food for livestock, and later a food staple for slaves in the South, the fields of black-eyed peas were ignored as Sherman’s troops destroyed or stole other crops, thereby giving the humble, but nourishing, black-eyed pea an important role as a major food source for surviving Confederates.

Today, the tradition of eating black-eyed peas for the New Year has evolved into a number of variations and embellishments of the luck and prosperity theme including:

  • Served with greens (collards, mustard or turnip greens, which varies regionally), the peas represent coins and the greens represent paper money. In some areas cabbage is used in place of the greens.
  • Cornbread, often served with black-eyed peas and greens, represents gold.
  • For the best chance of luck every day in the year ahead, one must eat at least 365 black-eyed peas on New Year’s Day.
  • Black-eyed peas eaten with stewed tomatoes represent wealth and health.
  • In some areas, actual values are assigned with the black-eyed peas representing pennies or up to a dollar each and the greens representing anywhere from one to a thousand dollars.
  • Adding a shiny penny or dime to the pot just before serving is another tradition practiced by some. When served, the person whose bowl contains the penny or dime receives the best luck for the New Year, unless of course, the recipient swallows the coin, which would be a rather unlucky way to start off the year.

The catch to all of these superstitious traditions is that the black-eyed peas are the essential element and eating only the greens without the peas, for example, will not do the trick.

And there are even more wives tales to go with the fare of the day as Shirley Drosyk elaborates here:  

  http://www.troymessenger.com/2010/12/30/black-eyed-peas-greens-and-good-luck-in-2011/

Well that explains it!  Last year, we ate grilled chicken and steak.  This year, we’re going to go with hot dogs cooked over a fire, multiple pots of greens and cabbage, complimented by a whole roll of dimes!  Simply put…. we’re not going to take any chances!

And I bet you didn’t know that buying a new home on New Year’s eve will bring good luck also.  It will.  I promise.

Trey Lewis is a licensed Real Estate Broker in the State of Tennessee with Ole South Realty, www.OleSouth.com, 615.896.0019  direct 615.593.6340.  Specializing in new homes in the Greater Nashville area to include Nashville, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, and Spring Hill, Tennessee.

Nashville New Homes: 2011 is looking up!

The New Year of 2011 is upon us, and I couldn’t be happier!  Even the media is spreading positive news about the housing industry.  Here’s one example:

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2010-12-28/housing-seen-rising-to-3-year-high-with-boost-for-jobs.html

The time is now to buy a new home.  Not just because fixed interest rates are historically low and rising, Not just because costs are going up and not yet being passed on to the consumer.  Not just because of great incentives and selections of brand new homes at www.OleSouth.com

Buying a new home offers many tax advantages for those that can itemize expenses.  Your closing costs are deductible.  Your property taxes are deductible..and the list goes on.  Here is a list of 2011 tax tips.  Pay special attention to #4!

http://www.bankrate.com/finance/taxes/10-tasty-tax-tips-for-2011-1.aspx?ec_id=cmct_003

If you weren’t able to purchase a new home in time for Christmas, inking a contract before the New Year could be the next best thing!