Remember the Blue Moon? It’s back – and better than ever!

Just about everyone remembers The Blue Moon, the popular floating bar and grill at Rock Harbor Marina on the Cumberland River in West Nashville.

The May 2010 flood brought an end to the old Blue Moon, along with many of the docks at Rock Harbor Marina. Since that time, the marina has been rebuilding, and that included the addition of a BRAND NEW BLUE MOON RESTAURANT.

BlueMoonPatio

One thing that made the previous Blue Moon a success was the atmosphere. The new Blue Moon is even better. You still walk onto a floating barge and down a dock to enter the restaurant! No worries, there are emergency exits and the facility is handicapped accessible.

BlueMoonFountain

There are indoor and outdoor dining areas, but also roll up doors to open things up a bit!

BlueMoonInterior

Large flat-screen TVs adorn the walls – perfect for keeping up with all the news and sports!

BlueMoonBar

We recently had the priviledge of sampling many items that will be featured on the menu. Two words immediately come to mind….. damn good!

The Blue Moon is now open to the public Wednesdays through Sundays and is certain to top the list of hot spots in Nashville. One visit and you will see why! Tom, Glenn, and Dougie Ray have put together a great team to make your floating dining experience enjoyable!

You can get there by car or boat! Located at Rock Harbor Marina, 525 Basswood Avenue, Nashville, TN 37205, or Cumberland River Mile Marker 175.

For the latest information, visit their website www.bluemoongrille.com

If you come by boat, there will soon be brand new covered slips of all sizes to park your boat in!

RockHarborNewDocks

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Trey Lewis is a licensed Real Estate Broker in the State of Tennessee with Ole South Realty, 615.896.0019 direct 615.593.6340. Specializing in new home sales in the Greater Nashville area to include Nashville, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Gallatin, Clarksville, and Spring Hill, Tennessee.

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Nashville New Homes: How did you ring in 2012?

We can now say good-bye to 2011 and hello to 2012.  It’s going to be a great year!  Period!

I made some grand plans for New Year’s Eve 2011, which is also our Blue Doberman Ruby’s first birthday.  Docking reservations for our boat were made at Nashville’s Riverfront Park.  Lynrd Skynrd would be there, right where the music note would drop.    Fifty-thousand people were going to be there too.  People would line the Shelby Street Pedestrian Bridge to see what we would be right in the middle of below.  Ruby was going to be excited that all of this was just for her. 

Beth wasn’t quite as excited about the new plans.  After all, Ruby is scared of fireworks.  And what about all those people on the bridge looking down on us?  In a crowd that large, someone would probably pee off that bridge.  Besides that, in past years, we had not stayed up until midnight anyway.  Hard to argue with common sense.

So, on December 26th, we took our boat back to Blackjack Cove Marina on Old Hickory Lake after an enjoyable stay with our friends at Rock Harbor Marina on the Cumberland River.  We would celebrate Ruby’s Birthday and the New Year at Blackjack Cove Marina and the Black Pearl Restaurant.   Ruby liked the idea because she had missed her friend Storm while we had been gone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If increased activity along the Cumberland River is a sign of better times, the good times are on the way back to Middle Tennessee!

 

‘The Plan” for New Year’s Eve at the marina came together perfectly, and we actually managed to stay up past midnight too!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have you ever heard of Polar Bear Tubing?  That was the plan for noon the next day… so we set out to find them.

And we did.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And yes, they really were “Polar Bear Tubing.”

And we ended New Year’s Day 2012 with a feast among friends.  Cabbage, Black-eyed Peas, Cornbread, Pork Roast, Deer Meet, Beer Can Chicken, etc etc.

Yes, it looks like 2012 is going to be just fine!  Join us!

Nashville Homes Blog: It’s Christmas on the Cumberland

Christmas in Nashville.  There’s so much going on, and its hard to experience everything in one season.

The Nashville boating community is a great group of folks, consisting of boaters from the Cumberland River, Old Hickory Lake, and Percy Priest Lake.  While many decorate their homes, there are others that decorate their boats.

And then there are some groups that go all out for the season.  One such group is the Rock Harbor Yacht Club, who kicked off the Fifth Annual “Dock Crawl” this past weekend at Rock Harbor Marina.  If you are a boater, or enjoy boating, this is a must-do event.

This year’s celebration centered around various crock pots and platters, followed by specialty drinks at each boat.  Afterwards, the group crawled to the club house for karaoke, a true sight to behold!

While this event provided a good time to all, it also served the needs of many area children.  Every participant donated a toy, or a $10 donation, to Toys For Tots.

We were glad to be able to make the trip down from Blackjack Cove Marina on Old Hickory Lake to enjoy this year’s dock crawl.  It was great to see visiting boats on The Great Loop also in attendance.   Rock Harbor welcomes transient boaters all year round and is just minutes from downtown Nashville!

If you are considering “The Great Loop” trip on your boat, make it a point to enjoy the sights and sounds of the Cumberland River and Old Hickory Lake during your voyage!  If you come to downtown Nashville’s Riverfront Park for New Year’s Eve 2011, we’ll see you there!  And so will Lynrd Sknyrd!

Now, enjoy the sights of Rock Harbor Yacht Club’s 2011 Dock Crawl:

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Nashville Homes Blog: Santa’s early visit to the Cumberland River

To many residents of the Waterford Subdivision in Nashville, Santa has already arrived in town, and he has set up shop on the Cumberland River.

View of Waterford from Upstream Cumberland River

Except this year, he didn’t arrive in a sleigh full of toys.  He arrived with barges full of gravel.

Choctaw Transportation Company Tow Boats

Many remember that the Waterford subdivision was devastated from the now-infamous May 2010 Flood.  Those homes you see overlooking the barges were actually underwater.  Many say this subdivision should have never been built, but that is hindsight.  It was built, and it suffered.  Take a look at the erosion that has taken place over the years:

In September of this year, work started on the Waterford Stabilization Project, in which plastic sheeting is attached to the riverbank and covered with rock, commonly called rip-rap.  Over 100,000 tons of rock will be used to stabilize this 1/2 mile stretch.

The May 2010 flood dealt a harsh blow to Nashville, and many areas are yet to recover.  This project is just one sign that good things can come out of bad situations.   Just ask one of those residents!

Meanwhile, further downstream in the Pennington Bend area, activity seems to be breaking loose.  Although many homes are still like they were after the flood, many have been totally remodeled, or are in the process.  I know of a totally renovated 3-bedroom, 2 bath ranch with a sunroom that will be available for rent in January.  And this is the view you will see every day from your backyard:

Ingram Barge's David K. Wilson

There are several new homes being built along the river, just upstream from Opryland:

New Home on the Cumberland River

And not just homes are being renovated on the river!  Lets check the progress being made at the old Nashville Bridge Company Offices in downtown.  Here is the story:  http://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/stories/2010/10/04/daily20.html

And further downstream, an older renovation project is still moving forward, the former Neuhoff Packing Plant.  Remember Frosty Morn?    http://wikimapia.org/1560269/Historic-Neuhoff-Buildings

Here are pictures of the Neuhoff Building that I borrowed from another site:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/greystgirl/sets/72157608368624763/

Rivers and Lakes have always attracted people.  The risk of possibile flooding is outweighed by the certainty of a great lifestyle.  If you have ever wanted to live on a lake or river, now is a pretty good time to start exploring.  And guess what?  I want to help you when you do!

Trey Lewis is a licensed Real Estate Broker in the State of Tennessee with Ole South Realty, 615.896.0019  direct 615.593.6340.  Specializing in new homes in the Greater Nashville area to include Nashville, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Clarksville, and Spring Hill, Tennessee

Spend the night on a real steamboat? You still can in Tennessee!

Although I didn’t take this picture, I remember visiting the Delta Queen one evening when it was moored at Nashville’s Riverfront Park in 2007.   The lights were dim, and all was quiet.  Puzzled by this at 9:00 pm, I approached a crew member and enjoyed a great conversation about life on the Delta Queen.  It was dark and quiet because everyone had gone to bed!

Here is a log of a 2007 voyage of the Delta Queen, including its stop in Nashville.     http://maritimematters.com/2010/09/log-of-the-steamboat-delta-queen-along-southern-rivers-part-one/

We have also passed this historic liner many times during recent years on the Cumberland, Ohio, and Tennessee Rivers.   That is a sight we won’t see any more, thanks to the US Congress, who refused to renew the Queen’s exemption from the 1966 SOLAS (Safety of Life At Sea) Act, an exemption that every President has signed since Richard Nixon in 1970.  Read the history of this vessel here:  http://www.deltaqueenhotel.net/#!abouth-the-dq

In February of 2009, the Delta Queen arrived in Chattanooga to become a floating hotel at this city’s vibrant riverfront.   From $89 per night, you can step back in time and experience the closest thing to the “glory days” of river travel.  If you don’t have time for overnight, why not visit for a meal?  Here is a link to the hotel website.  http://www.deltaqueenhotel.net/

It is interesting that the Queen’s “Brother Ship” the “Delta King” serves in a near identical capacity in San Francisco, where the two began service together in 1927.   http://www.deltaking.com/  Of the steamboats, the Delta Queen and King are among the luckiest.

The Delta Queen Steamboat Company owned three “Queens,” all of which ceased operating in 2008.   The “Mississippi Queen” was launched in July 1976 during our nation’s bicentennial and traveled the inland rivers until being sold for scrap in 2010.  Here’s the story:

http://www.nola.com/business/index.ssf/2010/06/mississippi_queen_paddlewheel.html

I can remember passing the Mississippi Queen on the Cumberland River several times as well.  What a sight.

The third “Queen” is the “American Queen,” launched in 1995 as the largest steamboat ever built.  For Sale with fate unknown, she sits mothballed in Beaumont, Texas with the US Maritime Reserve Fleet hoping for better days.

 When it comes to embracing a city’s riverfront, Chattanooga is light years ahead of Nashville and should be commended for saving the Delta Queen. 

With our emerging status as a “world-class” city, would Nashville possibly consider a project using the American Queen at Riverfront Park, or even Opry Mills?  It’s an idea certainly worth consideration…especially since Bill Purcell is no longer in office to deem it a Homeland Security risk to Riverfront Park.  :0)

Even more reasons why Tennessee is the greatest place in the world to live.  Come join us!

Trey Lewis is a licensed Real Estate Broker in the State of Tennessee with Ole South Realty, 615.896.0019  direct 615.593.6340.  Specializing in new homes in the Greater Nashville area to include Nashville, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Clarksville, and Spring Hill, Tennessee

Nashville New Homes: Another Day on the Cumberland River – Part I

Friday afternoon, 8 of us departed Blackjack Cove Marina on Old Hickory Lake for a 46 mile journey down the Cumberland River to Commodore Yacht Club, where an annual brunch was taking place on Saturday.  Since this Sunday was to be the “end of the world,” we weren’t going to take any chances on missing a last river trip.

Gates of Old Hickory Lock

The weather was gorgeous as we approached Old Hickory Lock.  The lock works much like the tank on your toliet.   Flush to go down, fill it to go back up. There are floating “mooring bits” to tie onto in side the lock.

Tied up in the lockExiting the lock

 Within minutes, we were flushed down to the river below.  We exited Old Hickory Lock at 4:10 pm.

There are many interesting sites, and a lot of history along this river.  There are also many pieces of residential real estate along the river that most people don’t even know exist.  It was great to see that many homes damaged in the May 2010 flood have been rebuilt.  But there are also those that have not. 

There will be visual reminders of this catastrophe for years to come but now is a great time to buy riverfront property for a completely different and relaxing lifestyle.   And even though there is the chance of flooding, the investment potential is great.  They simply aren’t making any more riverfront property!

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All of the above scenes were taken on the 25 mile stretch of river between Old Hickory Lock and Nashville’s Riverfront Park, where we arrived at 5:50 pm to spend the night.

There was considerably more barge traffic on the river than usual.  Lots of sand, and even more coal!  It is amazing that each barge can hold the equivalent of 53 tractor-trailer loads of material.  

One of Ingram’s boats that I am partial to is the “Martha Denton,” which was named after a dear friend of our family that I have known since birth.  Yep, a long damn time. 

Ingram Barge Company's Martha Denton

Before she passed away last year, Martha joined us for a day on the boat and we learned the history of each individual the Ingram boats are named after.  It is ironic that some of the boats actually seem to take on the “personality” of their namesake!   Seeing the Martha Denton brings a smile every time we pass.  A very fitting tribute to a great lady.

Downtown Nashville is simply beautiful.  The river flows through its center much like blood flows through the heart of the body.  I hope one day Nashville can have a Riverfront to be proud of, much like Knoxville and Chattanooga.  Clarksville has greatly improved their riverfront and docking facilities too.  Why can’t we?

Docked at Riverfront Park

 The administration of Mayor Karl Dean is directing much-needed emphasis to the East Bank and it is great to see the progress.  I think his administration just might “get it” when it comes to a viable Riverfront.

Richard Fulton was the first mayor to acknowledge that we even have a Riverfront, and the docking facility we currently have was built on his watch. 

Nothing much has happened since then, except for the addition of courtesy docking for LP Field and Mayor Bill Purcell removing docking privilidges during holidays and special occasions under the disguise of Homeland Security concerns.  

Perhaps the real reason was that he didn’t have a boat and wanted to get even with everyone that did.  Regardless, it was a stupid policy that remains in effect to this day.

In reality, it is time for all of the docking facilities to be located on the East Bank.  Spend the night on a boat at Riverfront Park, or try and navigate a string of barges under the Shelby Pedestrian Bridge and you too will agree. 

Friday evening, it was our intention to hit the nightspots of downtown in a big way.  We never made it.  Too much good food and good friends to leave! 

In the next blog post, we’ll look at other scenes between downtown and Commodore Yacht Club, a 19 mile stretch of river.

Nashville New Homes: Back again to the Cumberland River.

What is back?   You used to see it regularly on the Cumberland River in the late 80’s and 90’s.  Doctors, Lawyers, Politicians, and other rich and powerful folk used to grace her decks and dining salons.  

Remember when 103 KDF ‘s Carl P. Mayfield used to have remote broadcasts on her from Riverfront Park?  What a coincidence she was 103-feet long too!  Everybody always waved at the owner.  He was a fun and popular guy.  Oh,  “The Good Ole Days.”

What I am talking about is the 103-foot motor yacht, named Dolce Vita, that once belonged to Mario Ferrari, owner of the legendary Mario’s on West End.  I have always wondered what happened to this Cumberland River icon.  I heard it had sunk, then there it was laid up at Rock Harbor in pretty rough shape.  Then, she disappeared and we never knew what happened.

Dolce Vita, at Rock Harbor Marina - in the early 2000's

There is something about older, classic boats.  The rich wood paneling, the classic lines, and the teakwood decks are not quite as evident on modern-day yachts.  Back in the early 90’s, I had the pleasure to join some rich friends for lunch aboard Dolce Vita, prepared by Mario himself.   He really is a gracious and colorful guy… and was a great host.  The atmosphere aboard echoed it’s name… “The Good Life.”

Back to the story.  It turned out that Dolce Vita had been purchased and taken to Louisville, KY.  It then ending up being “left for ruin” on the Ohio River.   I recently heard a rumor that it had been sold again, and was back in Nashville, tied to a bank of the Cumberland River below downtown.  Here is Dolce Vita, when it was “for sale” on the Ohio River.

Yesterday, our friends Cona and Rudy departed Old Hickory Lake on “The Great Loop.”   (Read about their trip in yesterday’s blog post https://nashvillehomesblog.com/2011/03/11/nashville-new-homes-another-floating-farewell/ or follow their trip blog at http://www.missellenadventure.blogspot.com/)

 I asked them to be on the look out to confirm the rumor of Dolce Vita being back in town.  This morning at 8:00 am, I received these pictures.  Well, I will be damned.  There it is.

It looks like a lot of the cabin “superstructure” has been removed, along with the pilot house.  I certainly hope the new owner will restore the classic lines she once had.  Until then, I’ll save judgement on this project being a classic “restoration.”   

One thing for certain, that 1966 hull is “structural” aluminum and should last forever if maintained properly.  Another certainty…. it will take many thousands of dollars to bring it back to life.  That is a strong commitment someone is apparently making.   Best of luck to them.  

Now, on to another subject…. you don’t have to undertake a boat restoration project, or any project for that matter, to live on the water.  And you don’t even have to mow grass.   Swim by choice in Old Hickory Lake or your own swimming pool.  Check this out:

You don’t have to own a boat to enjoy lakeside living.  But even if you do, you can dock it just a few footsteps away at the new Blackjack Cove Marina!  http://www.blackjackcove.com/.   Might as well leave the cooking behind too!

Trey Lewis is a licensed Real Estate Broker in the State of Tennessee with Ole South Realty, 615.896.0019  direct 615.593.6340.  Specializing in new home sales in the Greater Nashville area to include Nashville, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, and Spring Hill, Tennessee